Thursday, August 18, 2016

{Review} Noble


Nobel is the true story of Christina Noble. The story begins when Christina is a child living in the slums of Dublin. Life changes for her when her mother dies and she is taken from her father, along with all of her siblings, and placed in separate orphanages. 

The story bounces between the modern day Christina and her childhood. We see her as a young woman now living on her own and the horrors she overcomes to finally become independent. Her life was never easy. 

At the age of 26, she had a dream about Vietnam and determined that God was speaking to her. She held that dream for over 20 years until her own children were grown. On a visit to Vietnam she sees the street children and works on finding a way to help them. 

I always love a story that has a basis of truth behind it. This movie has more than just a basis. Christina knew exactly what it meant to live on your own with no one there to help. She was a street-smart child and she uses all of the things she learned as a young child to do all she could to help the needy children in Vietnam. 

Christina runs the Christina Noble Children's Foundation not only Vietnam but also in Magnolia. Her story is how following God's will for your life can reap many benefits to those around you. She took what was seemingly a hopeless story and filled it with hope for others. 



Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Visiting the Titanic


There is a great new place in Portland (well, it's been there about a year I think) called the Portland Science Center. They have exhibits that come in and stay for a few months so something new is always there. The first one they ever did (that I heard about) was Body Worlds. The first one we went to, back in April, was one about space and robots. At that exhibit, we were told the next one would be about the Titanic. I was pretty excited about checking it out when it came in.


When we arrived, we were all given a boarding pass. The pass contained information about a real person on the Titanic. At the end of the exhibit, they had lists of all the passengers who survived and those who didn't. It was a great way to make this whole exhibit a bit more real to those of us going through it. 

Throughout the exhibit, we could see the differences between the classes. This was also true at the end when we saw who survived and who didn't. Here are the differences in the menus for each class. 


And even in accommodations...
First class

Third class


Friday, August 12, 2016

{Review} Told You Twice by Kristen Heitzmann



Today this wonderful book, Told You Twice, releases to Amazon. I was fortunate enough to snag a copy of the first book in the series when it was on sale earlier this year. I devoured it and was thrilled to find out that the author was planning a sequel. It screamed for a sequel!

I was able to get on the launch team for this book and I have to say, I'm beyond thrilled to have been chosen. (All opinions, however, are my own.) Kristen is the type of author that just draws you immediately into the story and makes you care about the characters she has created.

We were introduced to Bo Corrigan, the main character of this book, in the first book, Told You So. Bo is an actor. A really good actor from the sounds of it. He also lives the Hollywood lifestyle of parties, girls, and drugs. He is trying to find something, anything, to dull the pain of his past.

At the end of the last book, his actions had caused some pretty serious consequences. This book starts to deal with all that follows. His star-filled life quickly becomes one of attempted murder and running for his life. He is determined that no one else will be hurt because of what he's done.

Once again, the book drew me right in. I can't recommend this series of book highly enough. And I strongly recommend reading them back to back. It's not necessary to follow the story line. Kristen does a great job of making them stand on their own. However, if you like big books like I do, reading them back to back makes it last that much longer.


Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Saturday, August 6, 2016

Water Fun


I've seen these balloons and heard from others who have used it. They seemed like the perfect solution for a hot summer day. We seem to be having quite a few of those this summer. 




We had a "bonus boy" over today. That's the name I give to the boys I watch from time to time. It typically is boys. Go figure says the mom to three of those creatures. 






They really seemed to have a good time. The balloons were okay. The color filled ones didn't really leave a mark except for when filling them. We didn't get all to fill. You can see in the bucket photo above how some didn't work. Our biggest issue, however, was that they didn't seem to burst on impact. And a full water balloon hurts when it hits. Overall they seemed to have a good time although they didn't get as wet as we had thought. 

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

{Review} The Cantaloupe Thief by Deb Richardson-Moore



The Cantaloupe Thief is the debut novel by Deb Richardson-Moore. Richardson-Moore is a former journalist from South Carolina who left the field and went to seminary. She ended up becoming a pastor at an inner city non-denominational mission church for the homeless. When one is a writer, they are told to "write what you know." She has done just that.

The protagonist of the novel, Branigan Powers, is a journalist for a small newspaper in a small southern town. She tried big city living once and didn't like it. She came back to her hometown and works for the local newspaper. She lives alone on a farm in the country with her dog, Cleo.

Her former co-worker, Liam, left the business and is now a pastor at a church with a homeless shelter attached.

The novel goes back and forth between "present day" and "ten years ago" as Branigan researches the only unsolved murder for their small town. There seems to be an element that points to the homeless population in town - the invisible population.

As Branigan delves into the mystery more and more it seems there are people out to stop her. She meets resistance and learns things are not always as they seem.

The plot twists in this novel were excellent. It kept me guessing right up until the end.



Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.